Interesting Case


#1

A man was in an argument of some kind when third person joined the fight and pushed the man to the ground. The man who was pushed pulled out a gun and shot the third person, who stumbled back inside and died. No charges were filed. I tend to agree with the decision. You?


#2

Florida has a “stand your ground law”. Before that you had to retreat from a threat, not now. However it doesn’t always work. It has been tried many times and usually is denied.


#3

Do you support this guy’s use of force, Will? I do, to my own surprise.


#4

I do and I do because the shooter was an old man who had been knocked down and menaced by a younger, bigger man. I would have done the same.


#5

All in all, those affected seem like horrible people. First the girl parks in the handicapped spot and the other guy quite rightfully calls her on it. Then her bf attacks him. Just no loss to the planet.


#6

I have no problem with the result.

What about this case?

As a bystander, admittedly it depends on my mood and day. If I’m stressed I probably would sit there and do nothing like everyone else. If I’m not stressed I’d like to think I’d do something. Perhaps asking him nicely to move would have worked. Could you imagine the nerve of him sitting and reading a magazine?


#7

If a woman stood up for me, I would have given that woman my seat. Nobody did anything.


#8

I would be ok with shooting that loud fat woman, too.


#9

Here is one where looking were civillian emergency health response is clearly the priority over lawsuit, as it should be in any chemical case. Should have some numbers handy andmaybe a visit to the wevbsite and a printout of emergency steps in case of (whatever accidental).
Good argument for posted MSDS.


#10

A good response, calling posion control first and getting the information, not police to arrest anyone or a lawyer in hopes of a large payout.:

She said one of the workers told her two cleaning lines were still hooked up to the latte machine, even when she brought back her coffee.

“The supervisor went and got the bottle that was hooked up to it and brought it over to the counter, and I took a picture of it, so I knew what I was working with — what I had consumed so I could talk to 811 and poison control,” Douglas said.

A call to poison control
Douglas contacted Alberta Health Services’ Health Link at 811 and was transferred to poison control. On Monday morning, she said she felt OK, although she planned to see her family doctor as soon as possible.

Douglas also shared documents provided to her by Alison Mackisey, Lethbridge and area brand manager for McDonald’s, that showed the chemical composition of the cleaning agent she ingested — citric acid, phosphoric acid, methyl-trimethyl-3, and 2-butoxyethanol.


#11

By the way I might not have noticed that if I ordered a lemon tea. I used to reorder lemon soju (not served at McDonald’s) that tasted like it came from the mop bucket. I just figure citrus reacts in different ways.


#12

It is an interesting case, but I don’t think there’s much controversy there. McDonald’s made a stupid mistake.


#13

It’s a regular procedure.


#14

What’s interesting is it may have not been the coffee. It says 2 cleaning lines were both hooked up to the latte machine. But ain a satement fromt he franchise owner it was actually the milk supply line.
“Unfortunately, the milk supply line was connected to the cleaning solution while this guest’s drink was made.”

  • Dan Brown, who owns the McDonald’s franchise
    “McDonald’s is renowned for its food safety protocols and I am sorry that this happened in my restaurant here in Lethbridge,” he wrote.

“What happened is that the machine was being cleaned as it is every morning. Unfortunately, the milk supply line was connected to the cleaning solution while this guest’s drink was made.”


#15

McDonald’s has gotten into trouble for due to the temperature of the coffee. High temp water or steam may have been just as effective in a steel machine, steam is good enough to clean thick grimed up engines if you have ever had the service done.

I remember the awful smell of the hot vinegar that was used to clean the coffee machines at one facility I was familar with. Seems like a good cleaning solution…for coffee…with slight vinegar aftertaste.

This can’t be used with milk. The milk will actually become thicker. I even had a soft mozzarella form just from adding some cold milk to hot apple cider I made from a packet. It had to be acetic acid and I don’t even know if the concentration was enough to be labeled vinegar with the measure of water.


#16

Maybe I should say moooooozzarella as it was cow milk and not bufala say butter not burrata.


#17

Good points, Mark. Overall, I think McDonald’s has a great record for food safety but nobody’s perfect. I don’t eat there often but I definitely go sometimes now that they’ve added healthy choices to their menu.


#18

I want to go back to the original posts and tie this in.
Are there any laws in that area that have charges for death/harm to carried unborn, stand your ground?
Quick curing would distribution of impact would be good for flesh with high level of injury/trauma.

Nothing more to mention on first story.

The second might have some bias, I better back off from you as I mentioned food in another topic, noticing your immediate reaction and I can see the correlation. I also am aware of what prevents you from that type of response.


#19

Everything and anything destroys your body.
Do any foods from the aforementioned increase staying power for you or produce a strong erection?
If so can you describe it in detail, please no images they are as swords at high velocity thrust and slashed at my eyes.


#20

No problem, Mark. I won’t post images of that.